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Lakeland Times, Minocqua, Wisconsin
Friday, November 16, 2018 7:30 AM
A Dane County circuit court judge heard oral arguments this week in The Lakeland Times public records case against the Wisconsin Department of Justice, pressing the state’s attorney to explain why previous case law supporting the release of names of employees disciplined for misconduct should not hold sway. (subscriber access)
  • A Dane County circuit court judge heard oral arguments this week in The Lakeland Times public records case against the Wisconsin Department of Justice, pressing the state’s attorney to explain why previous case law supporting the release of names of employees disciplined for misconduct should not hold sway. (subscriber access)
  • Logging continues to be the primary reason driving efforts to keep and enhance railways in northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. (subscriber access)
  • When it comes to the Fourth Amendment, recent state Supreme Court decisions have come under fire from both civil-libertarian conservatives and liberals, and now yet another potentially important search and seizure case is headed its way. (subscriber access)
  • The Lakeland Times is heading to court next week in an effort to force the state Department of Justice to release names of employees disciplined for misconduct that the department continues to shield from public access. (subscriber access)
  • Evers defeats Walker in Wisconsin blue wave
    A blue wave did not sweep across the nation Tuesday as much as Democrats had hoped, but in Wisconsin the story was different as a blue tide washed away Gov. Scott Walker, attorney general Brad Schimel, and every other Republican running for statewide office. (subscriber access)
  • The federal government has approved Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to reform the state’s BadgerCare Plus program for childless adults, reforms the governor says will help move people from government dependence to independence. (subscriber access)
  • For Walker, the economy speaks for itself
    For Gov. Scott Walker, who is seeking his third term as governor on Nov. 6, the economic record of his administration speaks for itself and should justify his return for another four years — record low unemployment, a higher than national average labor force participation rate, fewer regulations for Main Street and farmers, and billions of dollars in tax cuts. (subscriber access)
  • Evers says Wisconsin  is ready for change
    It’s a common Democratic theme in this mid-term election year — they are running to get things done, not engage in political arguments — and, in his bid for governor, state superintendent of education Tony Evers’s message is no different. (subscriber access)
  • U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy of Wisconsin’s seventh congressional district says he is proud of his eight years in Congress, a challenging time but, he says, one in which he and his Republican colleagues have helped to build a stronger, more prosperous, and healthier America. (subscriber access)
  • Engebretson pushes Medicare for all, beefed up IRS
    By her own telling, Democratic congressional candidate Margaret Engebretson has had a diversified career and professional life, taking many paths, but she says that accumulation of experience and knowledge has given her the tools she needs to take on incumbent Republican Sean Duffy in Wisconsin’s seventh district and to serve her constituents well. (subscriber access)
  • Swearingen runs on his record, experience
    After six years in the Legislature, state Rep. Rob Swearingen (R-Rhinelander), who is running for a fourth term in the Assembly, says he is a man of his record. (subscriber access)
  • Meier says his campaign is about getting things done
    Chris Meier, a substance abuse counselor and former school teacher, says he has spent most of his life dedicated to public service, and his candidacy for the 34th Assembly district is just his latest effort to stand up for the communities he believes in. (subscriber access)
  • Wisconsin attorney general Brad Schimel has devoted a lot of time and publicity to his office’s fight against opioid addiction in Wisconsin, and his campaign has been no different, with the attorney general pointing time and again to his hands-on fight against drug abuse. (subscriber access)
  • Josh Kaul, the Democratic nominee for attorney general, says he wants to make Wisconsin communities safer and stronger, and he says Republican incumbent Brad Schimel has imperiled that safety by mishandling crime lab testing, including dawdling on a backlog of untested rape kits Kaul says has left dangerous criminals on the streets. (subscriber access)
  • Wisconsin’s Democratic U.S. Senator, Tammy Baldwin, wears her progressive politics on her sleeve — not always politically fashionable in Wisconsin — but on her other political sleeve is an emphatic brand of bipartisanship that helps to balance her in the public eye. (subscriber access)
  • In her bid to upset incumbent Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin, state Sen. Leah Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa) says her campaign has one loud and persistent message: Wisconsin needs a clear, conservative vision in Washington. (subscriber access)
  • Last week marked the deadline for state agencies to submit their 2019-21 state budget proposals, and both Republican incumbent Gov. Scott Walker and his Democratic challenger, state superintendent Tony Evers, used the occasion to transform the budget documents into campaign advertisements, or at least into projections of their biggest themes. (subscriber access)
  • The nation’s newspapers won a big reprieve late last week when the International Trade Commission voted to repeal stiff tariffs on Canadian newsprint that the U.S. Commerce Department had imposed earlier this year. (subscriber access)

  • A growing and ever surging labor shortage — nationally, in Wisconsin, and in the Northwoods — is good news for workers this Labor Day weekend, but its’s terrible news for employers, and it’s sparking concerns about the sustainability of current levels of economic growth. (subscriber access)
  • The nation's newspapers are feeling the heat after the Trump administration imposed steep tariffs on Canadian newsprint earlier this year, and newspaper representatives are urging the International Trade Commission to end them, citing the burdensome impact, including closures and layoffs, especially at smaller community newspapers. subscriber access)
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