E-Editions | Subscriptions | Contact Us | About Us | Classifieds | FREE Classified - Items Under $50 | Photos | FREE E-Editions
Lakeland Times, Minocqua, Wisconsin
Friday, March 20, 2020 7:30 AM
Of all the Sunshine Weeks we have covered, this is simultaneously one of the most discouraging ones and one of the best ones. 

To say it another way, there’s a lot of bad things happening out there in the arena of transparency, but, in one sense, there is also a glimmer of hope. It is always the darkest before the dawn, and that may well be the case here.
  • Congress passed and the president signed a $2 trillion “stimulus” bill. (subscriber access)
  • It’s time to quit playing games
    We’ve seen enough, and we think most of citizens have seen enough, too. (subscriber access)
  • When Americans are confronting the most threatening national crisis in a generation or more, it would be uplifting to offer a few encouraging words about the president of the United States. And a few is about as many as can be offered at this point. (subscriber access)
  • Right now, a time for shared sacrifice
    These are tough times, and in tough times Americans unite. (subscriber access)
  • My sainted mother was a public school teacher until she married my father and immediately, as a married woman, was forced by local Massachusetts rules then in force to leave the classroom. 
  • To the Editor:

    Two non-binding referenda will appear on many April 7 ballots in Vilas and Oneida counties. 
  • To the Editor:

    I have a confession to make. I was at the Schoepke Town Board meeting on March 10.
  • Of all the Sunshine Weeks we have covered, this is simultaneously one of the most discouraging ones and one of the best ones. 

    To say it another way, there’s a lot of bad things happening out there in the arena of transparency, but, in one sense, there is also a glimmer of hope. It is always the darkest before the dawn, and that may well be the case here.
  • Is Joe Biden president yet?

    Biden certainly sounded like the commander in chief on Thursday, March 12, when he addressed the pandemic crisis in a sobering televised speech. Calmly yet firmly, he called the American people to action, proposed a substantive and detailed plan to mitigate the new coronavirus outbreak, and promised to protect the nation from future threats in cooperation with our overseas allies.
  • We’re hearing a lot as we approach the spring election about the importance of having nonpartisan redistricting after this year’s census. 

    It’s all the rage, we hear. In poll after poll, huge majorities say they want nonpartisan redistricting. Numerous towns have put that question on the ballot for April, and it does have a certain ring to it. (subscriber access)
  • What’s worse than a bureaucrat? The answer is, a bureaucrat unleashed when a Democrat is in power.

    This past week, we have witnessed just exactly how bureaucrats are behaving irresponsibly in the age of Gov. Tony Evers, no doubt with the blessing of Tony Evers. Maybe at the direction of Tony Evers. (subscriber access)
  • Why in the world is the federal government, 20 years into the 21st century, continuing to pour tens of billions of tax dollars into little-used mass transit rail projects? In a digital age with increasingly popular and affordable door-to-door ride-sharing apps such as Uber and Lyft, universal use of cars by all income groups and the revolution of smart driverless vehicles around the corner, subway systems and light rail are as old-fashioned as the rotary phone. (subscriber access)
  • The recent decision by Oneida County circuit judge Michael Bloom to dismiss the walking quorum complaint against Rhinelander mayor Chris Frederickson and four city aldermen is a case study demonstrating both how good-old-boy politics still dominates in Oneida County and how the state’s activist judges are, case by case, rewriting the state’s open meetings and open records laws. (subscriber access)
  • Good for Mike Bloomberg. 

    During his first debate, he slammed Bernie Sanders by saying: “We’re not going to throw out capitalism. We tried that. Other countries tried that. It was called communism, and it just didn’t work!” (subscriber access)
  • First, a confession: I really like presidential debates. Why, you ask? Because these debates give us voters the chance to watch and evaluate the candidates while they stand shoulder-to-shoulder and have to answer the same questions. Away from their carefully orchestrated campaign events, without their teleprompters or an audience of planted, friendly supporters, candidates in a debate are under pressure and facing criticism from both opponents and moderators. (subscriber access)
Looking for something older? Try our archive search
E-Editions | Subscriptions | Contact Us | About Us | Classifieds | FREE Classified - Items Under $50 | Photos | FREE E-Editions
Software © 1998-2020
1up! Software, All Rights Reserved.