E-Editions | Subscriptions | Contact Us | About Us | Classifieds | FREE Classified – Items Under $50 | Photos | FREE E-Editions
The Lakeland Times | Minocqua, Wisc.

Jim Tait 02/01-02/28/17

home : news : news March 23, 2017

3/3/2017 7:27:00 AM
Oneida County holds first shoreland zoning public hearing in Woodruff
Nick Sabato/River News

Oneida County Planning and Development members, from left, Scott Holewinski, Billy Fried, Dave Hintz, Jack Sorensen and Mike Timmons listen in at the shoreland zoning public hearing at Woodruff Town Hall on Monday night.
Nick Sabato/River News

Oneida County Planning and Development members, from left, Scott Holewinski, Billy Fried, Dave Hintz, Jack Sorensen and Mike Timmons listen in at the shoreland zoning public hearing at Woodruff Town Hall on Monday night.

Nick Sabato
River News reporter


After 77 meetings since 2010, the Oneida County Planning and Development Committee held the first of three public hearings for the new proposed shoreland zoning ordinance Monday at the Woodruff Town Hall.

The meeting featured zoning director Karl Jennrich, who gave a PowerPoint overview of the ordinance and allowed the public - which consisted of 19 county residents - to ask questions for clarification before moving into the public hearing portion of the meeting.

Committee chairman Scott Holewinski also broke down how the panel put together the new ordinance.

"The goal of the committee was to balance property rights and the protection of lakes, rivers and streams," Holewinski said. "Also, to make the ordinance more understandable to the public. It's also understood that to meet this balance, it will take greater attention to review, issue and inspect all permits in Oneida County."

In total, four people took to the podium to speak to the committee about the new ordinance.

Director of the Indian Lake Association in Sugar Camp, Dave Noel, was the first to speak, reading off a prepared statement.

Noel also spoke at a public hearing regarding zoning in Enterprise, Monico and Sugar Camp on Feb. 15, where the committee voted to remain status quo.

He again reiterated the residents' desire to remain under D-2 family residential zoning.

"We understand that there has been further discussion about the matter," Noel read. "Our interest is to continue the D-2 Single Family zoning designation regardless of any issues that the Town (sic) may have relevant to the 9.90 D, line 134ff, p. 3 of the Proposed Shoreland Protection Provisions."

The part of the ordinance Noel referred to in Chapter 9, Article 9 states the proposed ordinance would apply in the shoreland zones throughout the county and in towns that adopted comprehensive zoning. The three aforementioned towns did not adopt comprehensive zoning.

Kathy Noel of the Oneida County Lakes and Rivers Association was next to speak, also reading a prepared document that voiced displeasure, not towards the county, but the state.

"It remains the contention of the board of directors that the Oneida County Shoreland Zoning Ordinance is inadequate to protect our lakes and streams from unwise development and the resulting degradation of water quality," Kathy Noel read. "More specifically, we believe it fails to achieve its stated purposes."

The purposes Noel included were "furthering the maintenance of safe and healthful conditions and controlling water pollution," "protecting spawning grounds, fish and aquatic life," along with "preserving and restoring shoreland vegetation and natural scenic beauty."

Noel stated the OCLRA is going to support efforts to restore authority to local and county governments, while asking the county to encourage lake property owners to take protective measures.

Town of Crescent resident and former Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources employee Bob Martini also spoke at the hearing.

"I've learned that this particular shoreline zoning ordinance in Oneida County does not protect, adequately, the shorelines in Oneida County - our most valuable asset in the county," Martini said. "It doesn't do this, for all kinds of reasons, but we did have a good ordinance back in 2001, one of the best in the state. It was diminished in quality, effectiveness, over the last 15 years, but now changes that are very ill-advised from the legislature prevent us from restoring what we had."

Martini went on to attack the ordinance, making arguments against some of the most common complaints of the new laws.

The first was smaller lot sizes, reduced to 100 square feet of frontage, while also stating lakes cannot have a one-size-fits-all ordinance, because they are not all the same.

"The number of lots around a lake is the most determining factor in how much phosphorus eventually moves into the lake," Martini said. "If you have 100-foot lots, you're going to have more phosphorus moving into the lake over time. Lakes are all different. They are like people, they have different characteristics. Some need more protection than others. We can't do this anymore due to the ill-advised changes at the state level."

Martini stated, as did Kathy Noel, that the county's hands were tied in certain areas.

However, Martini also listed four things the county could do to help preserve and protect lake quality: working on local control, enforcement, education and ensuring what is still under county regulations have the most restrictive laws possible.

One common theme from speakers was for the zoning staff to help educate the residents in some form or fashion, with three residents imploring the committee to hire more staff members.

Holewinski made it known they would not respond to anything said by those speaking and would address comments made in the public hearings during a regular meeting on March 15.

Jennrich also told the audience at the end of the presentation the new ordinance would be a learning process for the committee, residents and zoning staff.

"It's going to be a learning experience for staff, it's going to be a learning experience for the committee, and it's going to be a learning experience for the public that is going to be regulated," Jennrich said. "So we will be working through this issue."

Nick Sabato may be reached at nsabato@rivernewsonline.com or via Twitter @SabatoNick.



Reader Comments

Posted: Monday, March 6, 2017
Article comment by: Jim L

How appropriate is the old quote from Daniel Webster ... and even today sits firmly in the seats of Oneida County elected officials:

“There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern. They promise to be good masters, but they mean to be masters”

-------------------------------------------------
From the above article:

Jennrich also told the audience at the end of the presentation the new ordinance would be a learning process for the committee, residents and zoning staff.

"It's going to be a learning experience for staff, it's going to be a learning experience for the committee, and it's going to be a learning experience for the public that is going to be regulated," Jennrich said. "So we will be working through this issue."
-----------------------------------------------

Perhaps the only thing that rings true in this, is that no one seems to know anything about "this issue".




Article Comment Submission Form
Please feel free to submit your comments.

Article comments are not posted immediately to the Web site. Each submission must be approved by the Web site editor, who may edit content for appropriateness. There may be a delay of 24-48 hours for any submission while the web site editor reviews and approves it.

Note: All information on this form is required. Your telephone number is for our use only, and will not be attached to your comment.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search
search sponsored by



Subscription Login
LOGIN | SUBSCRIBE












American Investigator





Ministry

Life | Snow/Trail Conditions | Road Conditions | Wisconsin Lottery | Facebook

Lakeland Printing, Inc. • P.O. Box 790 • Minocqua, WI 54548

The Lakeland Times • The Northwoods Super Shopper
Phone: (715) 356-5236 • Fax: (715) 358-2121

Members of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association, Wisconsin Community Papers, Rhinelander Area Chamber of Commerce, Minocqua Area Chamber of Commerce

Software © 1998-2017
1up! Software
, All Rights Reserved